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July 8, 2009

2009 Classic Motorcar Rally: Final results & trip home.

Filed under: 2009 CMR — chuck goolsbee @ 2:04 pm

Apologies for not posting this in a timely fashion. As usual my arrival home triggers a complete change in priorities and the wrap ups get postponed.

On the Sunday morning after the rally finished we gathered in the ballroom for the results and a nice brunch. To our eternal surprise Dad & I finished 4th in class, and 5th overall, which means that we actually improved over last year’s 6th place finish. This despite having blown an entire morning’s worth of checkpoints on Day 1! We accumulated 49 penalty points over the course of the rally, but only 11 of those were on-course, meaning that had we managed to stay on-course on Day 1 we’d likely finished in the top three cars. There is no way we could have won 1st place, as the Chockie-Slavich team in the little red Alfa managed to only accumulate THREE points the entire rally. The Beckers in the old Pontiac came in 2nd with 8 points, and the Olsens in the BMW CS came in 3rd with 18 points. The Swansons driving the BMW Z3 accumulated 22 points to win the Modern class and capture 4th overall.

We were awarded trophies for our performance, which in typical Doug Breithaupt style are model cars. Ours are BMW 503 roadsters, plus my car received a trophy for the best-finishing British car, which is a model of a Series 3 E-type.

Dad & I packed the car and headed up to Swartz Bay to catch a BC Ferry over to the mainland. We arrived within 20 minutes of a sailing to Tsawassen and were loaded aboard the big boat.

loaded on Deck 5
loaded on Deck 5

We left the car and found a comfy spot on one of the passenger decks. I occasionally wandered outside to fire off a few photos to capture the atmosphere of the ride for you:

Leaving Swartz Bay. Portland Island on the left, Vancouver Island on the right
Leaving Swartz Bay. Portland Island on the left, Vancouver Island on the right
I call this on the BOOM FERRY as it is obviously set aside for flammable & explosive loads they don't want on the big boats.
I call this on the BOOM FERRY as it is obviously set aside for flammable & explosive loads they don't want on the big boats.
Exiting Active Pass, which is a narrow passage separating Mayne Island and Galiano Island, and looking north-east across the Georgia Strait to the Lower Mainland. You can just see Point Roberts (a geopolitical oddity) in the US at the right edge of the horizon.
Exiting Active Pass, which is a narrow passage separating Mayne Island and Galiano Island, and looking north-east across the Georgia Strait to the Lower Mainland. You can just see Point Roberts (a geopolitical oddity) in the US at the right edge of the horizon.

A similar size BC ferry passed us going southbound through Active Pass, which was quite a sight. Two big ferries simultaneously crossing a very narrow, twisting channel:






After we made landfall at Tsawassen we drove north(a tad unintuitive) then east to get to the US border. The status sign on Highway 99 said the Peace Arch Crossing had a 90 minute wait, and the truck crossing queue was 60 minutes. I declined both and continued east to the next crossing just north of Lynden, WA. There the wait was measured in less than 5 cars. We zoomed through and headed home down I-5, arriving home mid-afternoon. We celebrated our excellent standing with a dinner at La Hacienda with the entire family.

1 Comment

  1. Very cool, great report, as always! I’m fascinated by the boaty stuff, since I’m a mountain boy and the only boat-reality I’ve got has to do with teeny tiny things, like canoes and kayaks. I’ve only ever been on one car ferry, and that was a teensy weensy cable-operated one outside Lodi, WI. The *entire* crossing took 6 minutes…!

    If ever I git my buns up there, I’d suuure like to try that watery transport!

    Comment by vrooomie — July 8, 2009 @ 2:42 pm

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